Monthly Archives: December 2013

Conference: The Space Between: Literature and Culture, 1914-1945, July 17-19, 2014, Institute of English Studies, London

From the website CFP

The 16th annual conference of the Space Between society will explore the notion of ‘crossing’ − whether of oceans, borders, classes, genders, disciplines or genres − as it relates to literature, art, history, music, theatre, media, and spatial or material culture in any country between 1914 and 1945. From 1930s writers and intellectuals crossing the class divide to the surrealist crossing of a sewing machine with an umbrella, from Virginia Woolf’s Orlando to Michael Curtiz’s Casablanca, from crossing the dance floor to spying and wartime betrayal, tropes and examples of crossing proliferate across the culture of the period. We invite proposals for papers considering any aspect of crossing whether literal or metaphorical, spatial or social, successful or unsuccessful. Topics might include:

  • crossing time and space
  • transatlantic crossings of American (North and Latin) and European cultures
  • crossing between east and west
  • crossing the Mediterranean
  • crossing travel and colonialism
  • crossing the breach between peace and war
  • crossing between friendship and enmity
  • crossing picket lines
  • broadcast media crossing the airwaves
  • border crossings
  • double crossings, voluntary and involuntary
  • identity crossing
  • cross dressing
  • cross purposes
  • cross-cultural activity

Keynote speaker: TBC

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words along with a short biographical statement to Nick Hubble at Nick.Hubble@brunel.ac.uk by 2 December 2013.

Conference Organising Committee:

Erica Brown, Sheffield Hallam University
Richard Hornsey, University of Nottingham
Nick Hubble, Brunel University
Phyllis Lassner, Northwestern University
Michael McCluskey, University College London
Ann Rea, University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown

New Book: Rebecca Shumway, The Fante and the Transatlantic Slave Trade

 

shumway.cover

From Amazon:

The history of Ghana attracts popular interest out of proportion to its small size and marginal importance to the global economy. Ghana is the land of Kwame Nkrumah and the Pan-Africanist movement of the 19 60s; it has been a temporary home to famous African Americans like W. E. B. DuBois and Maya Angelou; and its Asante Kingdom and signature kente cloth-global symbols of African culture and pride-are well known. Ghana also attracts a continuous flow of international tourists because of two historical sites that are among the most notorious monuments of the transatlantic slave trade: Cape Coast and Elmina Castles. These looming structures are a vivid reminder of the horrific trade that gave birth to the black population of the Americas. The Fante and the Transatlantic Slave Trade/ explores the fascinating history of the transatlantic slave trade on Ghana’s coast between 1700 and 1807. Here author Rebecca Shumway brings to life the survival experiences of southern Ghanaians as they became both victims of continuous violence and successful brokers of enslaved human beings. The era of the slave trade gave birth to a new culture in this part of West Africa, just as it was giving birth to new cultures across the Americas. The Fante and the Transatlantic Slave Trade pushes Asante scholarship to the forefront of African diaspora and Atlantic World studies by showing the integral role of Fante middlemen and transatlantic trade in the development of the Asante economy prior to 1807. Rebecca Shumway is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Pittsburgh.

Conference: Transatlantic Connections Conference Jan 15-18 2014

From their Website. Click here for more information!

Drew University, in association with the Institute of Study Abroad Ireland, is pleased to announce a conference titled TRANSATLANTIC CONNECTIONS. The conference explores relationships between Ireland and the USA, and papers will cover the following areas

Transatlantic connections in history, in particular, transatlantic cooperation in the Abolition of slavery, American and Irish independence, Civil Rights in both countries and the Irish Peace Process

Transatlantic themes in Literature: Critical & Creative work from scholars and writers.

Food Culture:  Comparisons of the cuisines of Ireland and the United States.  American Irish vs. Irish foodstuffs. History, heritage, and conviviality. The future of food and drink in Ireland.

Film Studies: Irish Cinema in the world

Surf Culture: Surfing & tourism in Ireland, visual culture, arts, music & surf culture, gender studies & surfing, Surfing & education.

The Drew TRANSATLANTIC CONNECTIONS Conference will take place in Bundoran, Co. Donegal, Ireland.

The Conference will also feature plenary lectures on historical and cultural topics pertaining to Ireland, America, and their relationship since the eighteenth century

New Book: Daniel Katz, American Modernism’s Expatriate Scene

This study takes as its point of departure an essential premise: that the widespread phenomenon of expatriation in American modernism is less a flight from the homeland than a dialectical return to it, but one which renders uncanny all tropes of familiarity and imme

katz.cover

diacy which ‘fatherlands’ and ‘mother tongues’ are traditionally seen as providing. In this framework, similarly totalising notions of cultural authenticity are seen to govern both exoticist mystification and ‘nativist’ obsessions with the purity of the ‘mother tongue.’ At the same time, cosmopolitanism, translation, an

d multilingualism become often eroticised tropes of violation of this model, and in consequence, simultaneously courted and abhorred, in a movement which, if crystallised in expatriate modernism, continued to make its presence felt beyond.

 

Beginning with the late work of Henry James, this book goes on to examine at length Ezra Pound and Gertrude Stein, to conclude with the uncanny regionalism of mid-century San Francisco Renaissance poet Jack Spicer, and the deterritorialised aesthetic of Spicer’s peer, John Ashbery. Through an emphasis on modernism as a space of generalized interference, the pr

actice and trope of translation emerges as central to all of the writers concerned, while the book remains in constant dialogue with key recent works on transnationalism, transatlanticism, and modernism
.