Category Archives: News

New Address: “Two Brave Women’s Tales During the Mexican Revolution”

The Faculty Forum Series at Midwestern State University presents Associate Professor of Spanish Dr. Claudia Montoya at 7 p.m. Feb. 17, 2016, in Dillard 101. Montoya’s topic will be Two Brave Women’s Tales During the Mexican Revolution, Edith O’Shaughnessy and Rosa E. King.”

Montoya says that the history of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1917) has been as diverse and abundant as the voices that were willing to narrate it, either through historical or fictional texts. The history and fiction were often mistaken for one another.

One group whose voice was marginalized in the history was that of the foreign nationals – particularly the Americans and the British – who had somehow managed to send word to their country of what had been happening in Mexico during that time.

Montoya will present a comparative analysis of the journey of two female travelers during the time of the Mexican Revolution. American Edith O’Shaughnessy (1870-1939) traveled with her husband, the diplomat Nelson O’Shaughnessy. Rosa E. King (1867-1955), a British citizen, became a widow right before the Revolution, and had to find the means to sustain herself and her two children during those difficult times.

The Faculty Forum is an interdisciplinary lecture series presented by MSU to provide faculty the opportunity to have their scholarship recognized in the community and to promote the exchange of ideas among colleagues. Committee members are Drs. Catherine Stringfellow, Suhua Huang, and Jonathan Price.

New Book: Transatlantic Romanticism by Andrew Hemingway and Alan Wallach, Eds.

From the University of Massachusetts Press:transatlantic.romanticism.cover That the Romantic movement was an international phenomenon is a commonplace, yet to date, historical study of the movement has tended to focus primarily on its national manifestations. This volume offers a new perspective. In thirteen chapters devoted to artists and writers of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, leading scholars of the period examine the international exchanges that were crucial for the rise of Romanticism in England and the United States.

In the book’s introduction, Andrew Hemingway—building on the theoretical work of Michael Lowy and Robert Sayre—proposes that we need to remobilize the concept of Weltanschauung, or comprehensive worldview, in order to develop the kind of synthetic history of arts and ideas the phenomenon of Romanticism demands. The essays that follow focus on the London and New York art worlds and such key figures as Benjamin West, Thomas Bewick, John Vanderlyn, Washington Allston, John Martin, J. M. W. Turner, Thomas Cole, James Fenimore Cooper, George Catlin, Edgar Allan Poe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Herman Melville. Taken together, these essays plot the rise of a romantic anti-capitalist Weltanschauung as well as the dialectic between Romanticism’s national and international manifestations.

In addition to the volume editors, contributors include Matthew Beaumont, David Bindman, Leo Costello, Nicholas Grindle, Wayne Franklin, Janet Koenig, William Pressly, Robert Sayre, William Truettner, Dell Upton, and William Vaughan. – See more at: http://www.umass.edu/umpress/title/transatlantic-romanticism#sthash.ZBjrHmlo.dpuf